by David Cohen

Tylan’s Kickstarter’s campaign for her new album One True Thing created a tremendous buzz and raised nearly $47,000 from 760 backers in 30 days. This was the second highest grossing Kickstarter campaign ever in the history of the folk/country category. 

This successful Kickstarter campaign helped Tylan make her dream a reality. After five studio albums and ten years on the road (which she would preffered to do less) with the internationally and acclaimed folk-pop quartet Girlyman, Tylan is returning to her roots with her debut stunning solo CD, One True Thing due out on June 18, 2013.

For a long time Tylan wanted to create an intimate solo album that is more raw and exposed. “There’s something about the raw, lyric-driven acoustic experience that has always appealed to me. I like the idea of having very little between the song and the listener. That’s where I come from.”

Working with producer Michael Connolly, the two were able to create this stripped-down sound, using a guitar, piano, Hammond organ, upright bass, cello, and the drums of fellow Girlyman member JJ Jones. “Michael is very good at creating an orchestra with just a few instruments and leaving lots of space for the song to come through.”

The first single on her solo album, "Already Fine," is a slow-burn acoustic duet with Amy Ray from The Indigo Girls, and highlights Tylan's introspective lyrics and strong vocals.  Girlyman's first CDs were released on Ray's Daemon Records label, and Tylan credits Ray for taking the band "under her wing."

One True Thing is  a solid example of a chilled-out personal journey led by a singer-songwriter with a passion for verbal expression and a subtle voice which adds power to the lyrics. Tylan is definitely worth watching out for contemporary American folk music, and for a great talent as a lyrical singer and acomplished songwriter.

When it comes to sexual orientation and gender indentity, Tylan describes herself as "very, very gay. I have always been out, and I love that is becoming fashionable to be out,"  she says. Her sexual orientation never created a negative impact on her music career, but her gender expression and ­­­­­her previous band named Girlyman did.

The term "Girlyman" might fit Tylan perfectly — or not at all. She is neither particularly girly nor a man, and yet she also blends the two.
"My gender expression is pretty masculine. I generally wear a jacket and tie," she says. "I think through the years, some people thought, 'That music is not for me,' but other people — who are either queer or open-minded or heard the music first — were drawn in and realized that it doesn't matter what people look like; it's great when people look different, and not everyone has to look the same."

After a difficult year following the break-up of a 16 years relationship coupled with the decision to end Girlyman, Tylan is happy again. Living in Sonoma, CA with her girlfriend, Ingrid, who is part of her band, life couldn’t be better. They are on the road together sharing with us the one thing they love most––their music.